Tag Archives: Australia

Australia wins day-evening Test, requires series against New Zealand

Updated November 29, 2015 21:35:15

Shaun Marsh bats on day three in Adelaide Photo: Series sealed … Shaun Marsh bats on day three in Adelaide. (Getty Images: Quinn Rooney)
Related Story:
As it happened: Nervy Australia wins day-night Test by three wickets to seal series
Map: Adelaide 5000

In India a couple of days ago, a Test against South Africa that ended in three days provoked outsized criticism from across the world for its turning wicket. In Adelaide, a Test between Australia and New Zealand ended on its third evening and was met with worldwide praise.

External Link: Australia v New Zealand third Test scoreboard

Across 75 Test matches since 1884, only one other Adelaide Oval match has finished in three days – when a rain-ruined pitch in 1951 saw 22 wickets fall on the first day, and the West Indies eventually chase 233 to beat Arthur Morris’ Australians on Christmas Day.

The lush pitch and outfield designed to protect the new pink cricket ball added juice for the bowlers, but also added intrigue to a series that had been played on batting paradises. And with 123,736 people in the gate – more than last year’s Test managed in a five-day thriller – you doubt the administrators are ruing lost time.

It was Australia who ended this arm wrestle victorious, with the unlikely figure of Shaun Marsh central to a difficult run-chase of 187, completed under floodlights with three wickets to spare in a final stanza that was equal parts tension and hilarity.

As befits their reputation, New Zealand refused to give up even when the match was against them. They looked like they would struggle when they were bowled out for an insufficient 208, and looked gone when Australia got to within a dozen runs of the target with only five down.

But a long period of becalming bowling brought them the wickets of Marsh for 49 and Peter Nevill for 10, and had Peter Siddle been caught first ball from his midwicket flick that so nearly went to hand, anything could have happened.

Even with two runs to defend, New Zealand stacked seven men in the cordon and dragged out the end, Tim Southee making Siddle and Mitchell Starc sweat.

Fittingly it was Siddle who scored the winning runs, adding to the mixed emotions of celebrating his return to the first-choice XI and mourning the death of his grandmother. It would also have been fitting for man of the match Josh Hazlewood to have been in the middle, after he set up the win with a career-best 6 for 70 to go with his first-innings 3 for 66.

More to come.

Topics: cricket, sport, adelaide-5000, sa, australia, new-zealand

First posted November 29, 2015 21:19:28

Sabung Ayam Online

Australia joins Commonwealth unit targeting extremists

Posted November 29, 2015 16:31:12

An international unit aimed at countering extremism and radicalisation will acquire $ 2.5 million in funding from Australia, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has announced.

The initiative was announced at a meeting amongst Commonwealth heads of government in Malta, and has also been financially backed by the United Kingdom.

Australia will send a group of experts to work with civil society networks and governments to assist create technical knowledge in tackling the threat of violent extremism.

“So understanding what is attracting young folks, mostly young folks, to extremist ideologies grappling with that and promoting a culture — which is quite constant of course with the culture of the Commonwealth — of mutual respect,” Mr Turnbull said following the meeting.

Mr Turnbull stated it was essential to respond swiftly to on-line threats simply because extremist ideology was “dynamically driven” via these indicates.

Commonwealth secretary-common Kamalesh Sharma said despite the fact that the unit had only secured funding from two Commonwealth members, it gave “a really powerful hint” for other states to do the same.

“Since this is a result in that is going to be just before us for a quite extended time,” he said.

Australia has reviewed its own counter-terrorism laws this year and implemented a number of measures to target the expanding terror threat.

Topics: terrorism, government-and-politics, federal-government, world-politics, malta, australia

Sabung Ayam On the internet

Environmentalists urge Australia to send Customs ship to Southern Ocean

Posted November 29, 2015 16:40:50

The Greens and activist group Sea Shepherd have urged the Federal Government to send a Customs ship to the Southern Ocean to stop Japanese whaling.

Japan has announced it will flout an International Court selection and resume whaling operations in the area early subsequent year.

The International Court of Justice final year ruled that whaling in the Antarctic must cease instantly. At the time Japan stated it would respect the choice, but has announced it will start off once more.

Peter Hammarstedt from conservation group Sea Shepherd stated it was a bad selection.

“The current announcement by the Japanese whaling fleet that they will be returning south to the Southern Ocean whale sanctuary to unlawfully kills whales is an absolute finger in the eye of the International Court of Justice, and a slap in the face of the Australian Government,” he stated

The Federal Opposition has asked Government to raise the issue of whaling at subsequent week’s climate conference in Paris.

Environment spokesman Mark Butler mentioned representations ought to be made to Japan’s delegation at the meeting.

“It really is now incumbent on Malcolm Turnbull at the highest level to make quite powerful representations to the Japanese Government,” Mr Butler stated.

“I hope that he does that at one particular of the summits he’s attending in coming days.”

Greens senator Nick McKim said the scenario needed even stronger action from the Government.

“Get a Customs boat down into the Southern Ocean,” he stated.

“It is beyond time just for words and it is time for action and that’s why we need to have a boat down there gathering proof against Japan for future court instances.”

Customs boat a pre-election promise

Before the final federal election the coalition repeatedly promised to send a Customs vessel to monitor whaling in the Southern Ocean.

But in a statement to the ABC, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop was non-committal.

“The Australian Government has created representations at the highest level to urge Japan not to resume whaling this year and to comply with its international obligations,” she mentioned.

“I have raised the Government’s concerns directly with foreign minister [Fumio] Kishida and discussions are ongoing.

“Australia will continue our efforts in the International Whaling Commission to market whale conservation and uphold the global moratorium on commercial whaling.”

Sea Shepherd’s Mr Hammarstedt supported the thought of sending a Customs ship to the location.

“Any assets could potentially be seized belonging to the Japanese whaling fleet because there is an Australian Federal Court judgement that has fined these whalers $ 1 million for killing whales in a whale sanctuary,” he said.

“Also they could document what is taking place, it’s documentation that requirements to get back to the International Court, documentation that requirements to be seen by the Australian folks.”

Japan killed 251 Minke whales in the Antarctic in the 2013-14 season. Whalers could set sail once more prior to the end of the year.

Topics: whaling, planet-politics, greens, tas, japan, australia, asia

Sabung Ayam On-line

Australia edges fascinating second day in Adelaide Test

Updated November 28, 2015 23:09:33

Martin Guptill trudges off the field on day two at the Adelaide Oval Photo: New Zealand batsman Martin Guptill leaves the field after being dismissed by Australia’s Josh Hazlewood for 17. (AAP: Dave Hunt)
Related Story:
NZ leads Australia by 94 runs after day two: As is happened
Map: Adelaide 5000

Not every day of Test cricket is filled with verve. Not every day produces a thrill. Even if you love the game, you know that some days wander to their conclusion with the dry feeling of a responsibility discharged rather than a drama played out or a work of art created.

But the second day and night at the Adelaide Oval offered all these things, as the crepuscular Test match continued to offer the most competitive and entertaining cricket in this Australia versus New Zealand series.

External Link: Australia v New Zealand third Test scoreboard

The only blemish was an embarrassing mistake by third umpire Nigel Llong: solitary, but of a magnitude that might yet decide the winner.

On a mild Adelaide afternoon, the endless days of batting from Brisbane and Perth faded like the memory of a long and meandering train trip, as life for Australia’s batsmen suddenly got tricky, and then hard, and then downright devilish.

At its worst Australia’s score was set to crash to 9 for 116, with only Mitchell Starc left to limp in on a fractured foot.

But Llong’s mystifying reprieve of Nathan Lyon allowed a lower-order rally to take the team to 224, a lead of 22 runs on the first innings.

How significant it would prove. Josh Hazlewood and Mitchell Marsh responded with great intent to Starc’s absence as a bowler, combining to remove New Zealand’s top five batsmen with 98 on the board, and to curtail the visiting side to 116 by stumps, a lead of 94 runs with five wickets remaining.

Even if New Zealand’s lower order can fight on tomorrow, with Mitchell Santner to resume on 13 and BJ Watling on 7, this is a game that should now finish within three days.

But there will be none of the wailing accompanying the concurrent match of the same duration between India and South Africa.

The comparatively low scores in this match have been down to some very good bowling, a pitch with a modest amount of assistance, and a lot of batting without due attention or care. It’s hard to object to a short contest that has remained a contest throughout.

Given the way Steve Smith and Adam Voges breezed to centuries in each other’s company in Perth, you couldn’t help expecting more of the same when they jogged out to face the bowling.

But Tim Southee was all over Voges in the third over of the day: an edge past slip for four, a leading edge for none, then a catch to third slip to end the batsman’s stay for 13.

External Link: Grandstand at stumps day two

Edginess ends in calamitous run-out

The suffocating stand between Smith and recalled batsman Shaun Marsh set the tone for the rest of the innings. Smith was nervous about a team slide, Marsh was nervous about his place in the side, and Smith was nervous about Marsh’s nervousness.

Through the next 24 balls only four runs were added.

Then Marsh pushed to long off, Smith turned to watch the ball, Marsh ran without calling, Smith turned back and started to run, Brendon McCullum dived and gathered in the rebound, both batsmen stuttered, and by the time they continued McCullum had thrown down the non-striker’s stumps from flat on the ground.

Marsh had gone for 2, and as one Twitter wag noted, raised his Adelaide Oval batting average to 1.66.

The younger Marsh brother, Mitchell, lasted twice as long – 25 balls for 4 runs instead of 12 balls for 2 – before nicking a wide Doug Bracewell ball with a prod.

Smith and Peter Nevill almost got to the tea break, but then disaster struck.

First Smith nicked the off-spin of Mark Craig after a mystifying charge and attempted wallop went wrong, and Watling took a stunning catch towards the leg side.

Peter Siddle edged to short leg the same over, then Santner drifted and spun a left-arm ball into Hazlewood’s stumps.

DRS controversy clouds brilliant day

Nathan Lyon and BJ Watling on day two at Adelaide Oval Photo: Lyon had walked most of the way to the fence before he was called back. (AAP: Dave Hunt)

It was 8 for 116 at that stage, then two overs after tea the key controversy arose. Nathan Lyon swept at Santner, the ball bouncing from the back of his bat into his shoulder and then to slip. The on-field umpire called not out and the New Zealanders instantly reviewed.

The replay clearly showed a deviation as the ball passed the bat, and a Hot Spot mark from two different angles, but the softer sound from the back of the bat didn’t make a notable spike on the Snickometer.

Lyon had already walked most of the way off the field after the first replay, but had a good five minutes to search for pink marks on his bat for Llong decided he was not out.

The decision has been savaged, and rightly so. All discussion of Hot Spot and Snicko aside, the plain old replay showed an edge that was not detected.

It’s just so frustrating, as players, as spectators, as whatever. The whole stadium thinks it’s out, and it’s given not out.

Chris Rogers

“For him to say there is no conclusive evidence is just unbelievable,” said ABC Grandstand’s Simon Katich after listening to the third umpire’s deliberations.

“It’s just so frustrating, as players, as spectators, as whatever. The whole stadium thinks it’s out, and it’s given not out,” added Chris Rogers.

To paraphrase Samuel L. Jackson, the decision broke New Zealand’s concentration. Lyon then played out the batting equivalent of It’s a Wonderful Life, celebrating his reprieve with joyous abandon.

Two fours and a six from a later Santner over were the centrepiece of a 74-run partnership with Nevill, ending when Lyon edged Trent Boult to gully for 34.

The hobbling Starc added further sting: his first-ball lbw was overturned on review, then his desire to avoid running manifested in three sixes and two fours. By the time Nevill was out to a brilliant diving Santner catch at deep point, Australia had gone from a possible 85-run deficit to a 22-run lead.

New Zealand went to the dinner break with all square, having made back those 22 runs without loss, and would have had hopes of playing through the opening bowlers to make Australia feel Starc’s absence.

But Hazlewood’s full length drew Martin Guptill and Tom Latham into nicks behind the wicket, then Mitchell Marsh produced an crucial spell, both for his team and for him personally after indifferent batting returns, removing Kane Williamson via an edge for 9, and McCullum leg-before for 20.

The conditions made life difficult for the batsmen, coming in under black skies to adjust to the glare and the bright ball, and McCullum especially struggled to pick it up.

Once Ross Taylor was lbw to a Hazlewood yorker, much of New Zealand’s two sessions of good work looked to have been undone.

“He let the ball do the talking,” said Grandstand’s Dirk Nannes in praise of Hazlewood’s mature approach. “If the wicket’s doing enough, just let the wicket do the work. You don’t have to blast teams out, just be persistent and hit that spot. The ball is going to take the wicket.”

But there remains the hope of easier batting tomorrow, and if New Zealand’s lower order can bat some time and extend their lead, Australia could end up being the ones having to chase under lights.

Like the rest of this Test to date, the opening exchanges on day three should make for compelling viewing. And even if it does wrap up, that leaves all the more time to invest in the Adelaide Oval social scene.

Topics: cricket, sport, adelaide-5000, sa, australia

First posted November 28, 2015 22:05:27

Agen Sabung Ayam

Cricket Australia enjoying the success of day-night Tests and planning for more

Updated November 28, 2015 23:32:17

Adelaide Oval under lights Photo: Nearly 90,000 attended the initial two days of the day-night Test played beneath lights at Adelaide Oval. (Getty Photos: Cameron Spencer)

Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland has signalled day-evening Test matches are set to continue subsequent summer following the early achievement of the match below lights at Adelaide Oval.

There were sighs of relief in Cricket Australia’s halls of energy right after the day-night format and the pink ball have been both well received in Adelaide and around the globe.

Nearly 90,000 fans have passed by way of the Adelaide Oval gates over the 1st two days for a taste of day-night Test cricket.

“I was probably far more nervous ahead of a Test Match than I have been for a long time,” admitted Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland when speaking to Grandstand ahead of the second day’s play.

“Clearly it is about access for fans and I think we saw that, 47,000 is a lot more men and women than have ever come to the Adelaide Oval for cricket in the modern day age considering that Bodyline. So that is a glowing endorsement.”

“[We’ve had] excellent feedback. Messages coming saying it was a excellent innovation, it will be excellent for the game, and nicely carried out on what has occurred.

“But I believe also, our media guys tell me that some of the media coverage about the world has been glowing.”

Remarkably for a conversation in cricket, there was really tiny dissent. Practically nothing from the first day gave grounds for it. Issues that the distinct ball and the various ground circumstances would have an effect on the integrity of the contest were allayed.

“I guess that is the element of caution that I have,” Sutherland said.

“We do need to make confident we get the situations appropriate for it. But in this day and age you like to consider that curators can get that proper and we are sophisticated adequate to be able to do it.”

That was the case at Adelaide, with the effectively-grassed pitch and square not only making certain the ball stayed in exceptional condition by means of the full duration of every single innings, but that the match was much more of a contest in between bat and ball than either daytime Test at Brisbane or Perth.

Sutherland confirmed that the good results so far had all but ensured we will see a lot more pink-ball contests next summer time, possibly 1 apiece against South Africa and Pakistan, with a broadening of the venues employed.

“Zakir Khan, a single of [the Pakistan Cricket Board] operating managers, was right here yesterday, which was good. They are touring subsequent year, and we are actually keen on continuing this. [Based on the] appropriate location, right time, proper circumstances, I think it would be a really excellent optimistic, and I consider the fans are calling out for it.”

“The Gabba is undoubtedly a great alternative. I recognize they’ve upgraded their lights, during the course of this winter. I would have thought a balmy Queensland evening at this time of year would be a genuinely wonderful place to be watching the cricket.”

As for no matter whether Adelaide would ever see an additional daytime Test: “I haven’t looked that far ahead, I’ve got to say.”

“The fans will rule that, but that’s going to countries as effectively. We need to get the approval of the visiting countries, and England, India and other countries may possibly be much more conservative on this.”

As Adelaide has proved in its test-case capacity, there’s nothing at all like present good results to support conservatism fall by the wayside. A day-night Ashes Test, with the final session beamed reside into the United Kingdom come breakfast time, may be the subsequent key talking point on the pink-ball agenda.

Topics: cricket, sport, adelaide-5000, sa, australia

1st posted November 28, 2015 22:59:30

Agen Sabung Ayam

Cricket Australia enjoying the success of day-night Tests and planning for more next summer

Posted November 28, 2015 22:59:30

Adelaide Oval under lights Photo: Nearly 90,000 attended the initial two days of the day-evening Test played below lights at Adelaide Oval. (Getty Pictures: Cameron Spencer)

Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland has signalled day-night Test matches are set to continue subsequent summer following the early accomplishment of the match below lights at Adelaide Oval.

There have been sighs of relief in Cricket Australia’s halls of power following the day-night format and the pink ball had been each nicely received in Adelaide and about the planet.

Virtually 90,000 fans have passed by means of the Adelaide Oval gates over the very first two days for a taste of day-evening Test cricket.

“I was possibly a lot more nervous ahead of a Test Match than I have been for a long time,” admitted Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland when speaking to Grandstand ahead of the second day’s play.

“Naturally it is about access for fans and I consider we saw that, 47,000 is far more folks than have ever come to the Adelaide Oval for cricket in the modern day age since Bodyline. So that’s a glowing endorsement.”

“[We’ve had] great feedback. Messages coming saying it was a wonderful innovation, it will be excellent for the game, and effectively accomplished on what has happened.

“But I consider also, our media guys inform me that some of the media coverage around the globe has been glowing.”

Remarkably for a conversation in cricket, there was extremely tiny dissent. Absolutely nothing from the 1st day gave grounds for it. Issues that the different ball and the different ground situations would affect the integrity of the contest have been allayed.

“I guess that’s the element of caution that I have,” Sutherland stated.

“We do need to have to make positive we get the circumstances proper for it. But in this day and age you like to believe that curators can get that correct and we are sophisticated adequate to be in a position to do it.”

That was the case at Adelaide, with the nicely-grassed pitch and square not only generating certain the ball stayed in exceptional condition via the complete duration of each and every innings, but that the match was considerably much more of a contest between bat and ball than either daytime Test at Brisbane or Perth.

Sutherland confirmed that the good results so far had all but ensured we will see a lot more pink-ball contests next summer, possibly a single apiece against South Africa and Pakistan, with a broadening of the venues utilised.

“Zakir Khan, 1 of [the Pakistan Cricket Board] operating managers, was right here yesterday, which was good. They are touring next year, and we are really keen on continuing this. [Depending on the] proper spot, right time, appropriate circumstances, I believe it would be a genuinely great good, and I consider the fans are calling out for it.”

“The Gabba is surely a very good option. I realize they’ve upgraded their lights, during the course of this winter. I would have believed a balmy Queensland evening at this time of year would be a genuinely excellent place to be watching the cricket.”

As for regardless of whether Adelaide would ever see another daytime Test: “I have not looked that far ahead, I’ve got to say.”

“The fans will rule that, but that is visiting countries as well. We want to get the approval of the visiting nations, and England, India and other nations might be more conservative on this.”

As Adelaide has proved in its test-case capacity, there is nothing at all like present good results to aid conservatism fall by the wayside. A day-night Ashes Test, with the final session beamed reside into the United Kingdom come breakfast time, may be the next major talking point on the pink-ball agenda.

Subjects: cricket, sport, adelaide-5000, sa, australia

Agen Sabung Ayam

Former terrorist warns Australia is a ‘ticking time bomb’

Posted November 28, 2015 09:56:27

The former deputy head of the Australian branch of Jemaah Islamiah has described Australia as a “ticking time bomb” as it struggles to contain the spread of radicalism.

Abdurrahman Ayyub was as soon as a single of Australia’s most-wanted terrorists.

Now he operates for Indonesia’s anti-terrorism agency, recognized as the BNPT, on its deradicalisation program.

In the nation’s prisons and in the communities, he spreads the message of moderate Islam.

“What Indonesia is performing is recognised by the globe now,” Mr Ayyub said.

“The counter-terrorism agency operating with each other with former radicals — that’s really important, because there is no way a doctrine can modify on its own without having dialogue.”

Australia not addressing radicalised youth: Ayyub

Mr Ayyub entered Australia in the 1990s to recruit and fundraise for Jemaah Islamiah, the terrorist group responsible for the Bali attacks.

Men and women can rapidly turn radical and intense, even even though now they appear calm.

Former terrorist Abdurrahman Ayyub

He fled Australia soon after the nightclub bombings in 2002, but insists he had no prior knowledge of the attacks.

He said Australia’s counter-terrorism strategies had been lacking dialogue especially with the nation’s youth.

“Australia is sitting on a time bomb, which means individuals can speedily turn radical and extreme, even even though now they appear calm,” Mr Ayyub said.

“What has Australia done in regards to these dialogues for the youth? Somebody who was just like I was.

“I am asking the query to Australia: What have you done about deradicalisation?”

Hundreds of Indonesian terrorists await prison release: Bishop

Mr Ayyub’s twin brother Abdul Rahim Ayyub was married to Australian-born jihadist Rabiah Hutchinson.

Their Australian kid, Mr Ayyub’s nephew, is now fighting in Syria.

“My nephew went there — Muhammad Ilyas, the son of Rabiah, he left to join ISIS,” Mr Ayyub mentioned.

They have changed their attitude, behaviour and hopefully also their mindset. So they no longer have their old approaches, their point of view has changed.

“How many like that are undetected? How several still hold grudges?”

Australia’s Foreign Minister has repeatedly expressed concern about convicted terrorists being released from Indonesia jails.

“A considerable quantity of prisoners in Indonesian prisons who have been convicted of terrorist-associated activities will be released. It runs into the hundreds,” Julie Bishop stated on the sidelines of the UN safety council meeting in New York in September.

“And of course, if they’ve not been rehabilitated, then they pose a serious risk, not only to Indonesia, but to our region.”

Indonesia’s correctional solutions physique says 41 convicted terrorists have been released from jail this year.

“According to our investigation, these inmates, prisoners, are reformed terrorists,” Akbar Hadi Prabowo, a spokesman at the directorate general of correctional facilities, stated.

“They have changed their attitude, behaviour and hopefully also their mindset. So they no longer have their old ways, their point of view has changed.”

Rehabilitation a ‘never-ending cycle’

Senior Indonesia Army commander, Significant General Agus Surya Bakti led the nation’s deradicalisation efforts as part of the BNPT.

“We stay vigilant,” Significant General Bakti mentioned.

“The approach of deradicalisation is a by no means-ending cycle.

Umar Patek, who made the bomb for the 2012 Bali bombings, in jail in Indonesia. Photo: Bali bombings explosives maker Umar Patek is regarded as a deradicalisation accomplishment story. (ABC)

“The rehabilitation approach in the prisons will be continued with rehabilitation approach in society.”

There are more than 250 terrorists detained in jails across the country.

Umar Patek, who is serving a 20-year sentence for creating the explosives used in the deadly 2002 Bali nightclub bombings, is now noticed as an Indonesian deradicalisation accomplishment story.

Video footage from Porong prison in east Java shows Patek raising the Indonesian flag.

“Who doesn’t know Umar Patek,” Main Common Bakti mentioned.

“He flew the flag, saluted it, it is an extraordinary thing.”

There has been no suggestion at this stage that Patek will be released early.

Subjects: terrorism, islam, prisons-and-punishment, law-crime-and-justice, indonesia, australia

Agen Sabung Ayam

The Tanzanian high school brought to life by Australia

Posted November 28, 2015 06:20:17

The class of 2015 at the School of St Jude Photo: The class of 2015 are the very first batch of students to complete higher college at the School of St Jude. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

As a journalist, it is not often you get to see a tangible example of the effect your perform can have.

Sometimes you hope that a distinct story will obtain some thing — expose an injustice or bring about a lot-needed alter, but most of the time, the planet goes on as it was.

So obtaining an invitation to return to Tanzania’s College of St Jude — the topic of an Australian Story system I developed in 2005 — turns out to be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

I am right here since about 4,000 Australian households signed up to sponsor young children at the college right after watching the plan and I have been invited as a specific guest to witness the graduation ceremony of the very first batch of students to complete high school.

It is a strange and humbling experience to be welcomed back as if I am the Bob Geldof of the College of St Jude.

“What is it like to see the college you constructed, Ben?” asks Gemma Sisia, who founded the college after moving from her house on a farm close to Armidale, NSW, to Africa at the age of 22.

Australian Story producer Ben Cheshire Photo: Ben Cheshire created a 2005 Australian Story program about the School of St Jude. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

Because I was final here, the college has grown from housing 500 students to almost two,000.

“Those sponsors who signed up following watching Australian Story are the backbone of the college,” she says.

“Time and again, I have mentioned that St Jude’s would not be the accomplishment it is nowadays with no the efforts of Australian Story.”

Actor Rebel Wilson quietly signed up after seeing the program — many years passed just before a young staffer in the St Jude’s workplace recognised the sponsor’s name as a star of film and television in Hollywood.

In the days leading up to the graduation ceremony, I maintain meeting much more and a lot more sponsors who can trace their involvement back to the Australian Story broadcast.

About 70 sponsors have created the trip from Australia to be component of the ceremony, which will be the greatest celebration in the school’s history.

I join 1 of them on a go to to the property of the student she sponsors.

Elizabeth Lekind Photo: Graduate Elizabeth Lekind pledged to turn into a doctor after a dramatic episode while performing volunteer perform in a neighborhood hospital. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

Elizabeth Lekind, 20, lives with her older sister Naomi, Naomi’s two young kids and their two cows in a little cement house not far from the college.

Elizabeth has pledged to grow to be a medical doctor, after a dramatic episode although undertaking volunteer function in a local hospital.

She encountered a lady lying in agony but getting no attention from the physicians and no medicine.

Gemma came with a dream of providing cost-free high quality education to poor children, and she dreamt of bringing up the future leaders of Tanzania.

Elizabeth Lekind

She raised some income from buddies and neighbours and came back the subsequent day with the medicine — but the bed was empty.

“They said she had passed away that night. So I came property crying and that was the day I decided to want to be a medical professional,” she says.

“I want to help men and women. From that day, I pursued medicine.”

Elizabeth Lekind believes Gemma Sisia has already transformed the future for her.

With no the College of St Jude, she would virtually undoubtedly be “married off” by now with a number of young children, simply because her household could not afford higher education.

“I see her as a mirror to my future. Gemma came with a dream of offering cost-free quality education to poor youngsters, and she dreamt of bringing up the future leaders of Tanzania,” she says.

“Several men and women would say that Gemma is a saviour. A saint.”

Gemma Sisia Photo: Gemma Sisia founded the college right after moving from her residence on a farm close to Armidale, NSW to Africa at the age of 22. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

On a second house visit, I meet eight-year old Emmanuel Kiwale in what can only be described as the slum of Arusha.

His household of 5 live in a tiny a single-area wooden shack with no toilet.

Emmanuel is one of 104 St Jude’s students who at the moment have no sponsor — an additional 165 are only element-sponsored.

His mother Mariam Omari says she is praying that God will send an individual, a sponsor for her son, so that he can continue to study all the way to university and get a great job.

That would improve all of their lives.

As graduation day dawns, Gemma requires to the stage, her voice cracking with emotion.

“It appears like only yesterday that you enrolled. I keep in mind when we had been issuing your uniforms,” she says, to thunderous applause.

“I don’t forget when you got sick. I bear in mind when you sat your initial national exams. You are the cause for this extremely unique day.”

Emmanuel Kiwale (in school uniform), mother Mariam Omari and his siblings Photo: Emmanuel Kiwale is 1 of 104 St Jude’s students who at present have no sponsor. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

As celebrations wind up with the presentation of the giant graduation cake — a cake that turns out to be a decorated, barbecued goat — I feel my faith in humanity getting restored.

To be a component of this project exactly where so many folks have worked with each other for a worthwhile objective has been an uplifting knowledge.

As I say to the students when it is my time to speak, it will be fascinating to watch their progress over the subsequent 20 or 30 years.

What if the future Tanzanian president, groundbreaking scientist or world popular musician is in this area these days?

And so now, if my youngsters or future grandchildren ever ask whether I have accomplished something to make the globe a far better location, I have a prepared answer.

It is my modest component in the achievement of the School of St Jude.

In Tanzania, exactly where a cornfield as soon as lay, now stands a school.

Exactly where little ones formerly had no better prospects than minding cows, 2,000 young children are acquiring a great education.

Graduates of School of St Jude Photo: Given that Ben Cheshire was last at the school, it has grown from housing 500 students to nearly two,000. (Supplied: Wolter Peeters)

Subjects: education, access-to-education, human-interest, neighborhood-and-society, charities-and-community-organisations, tanzania-united-republic-of

Agen Sabung Ayam

Australia takes opening day honours in day-night Test

Posted November 27, 2015 21:57:27

Hazlewood celebrates Southee dismissal Photo: Black Caps skittled … Josh Hazlewood celebrates the wicket of Tim Southee under the Adelaide Oval lights. (Getty Photos: Morne de Klerk)
Map: Adelaide 5000

Australia has taken day a single honours on the historic first day of the day-night Test against New Zealand at the Adelaide Oval.

External Hyperlink: Australia v New Zealand third Test scoreboard

Josh Hazlewood (3 for 66) and Mitchell Starc (3 for 24) both starred with the ball as the hosts dismissed the Black Caps for 202.

Even so, there have been key injury fears for Starc, who had to limp off with a suspected ankle injury, which could potentially see him miss the remainder of the Test match.

In response, Australia posted two for 54, with Steve Smith unbeaten on 24 and Adam Voges on 9.

David Warner fell cheaply for 1, while fellow opener Joe Burns was bowled by Doug Bracewell (1 for 6) for 14.

A lot more to come.

Subjects: cricket, sport, adelaide-5000, sa, australia, new-zealand

Agen Sabung Ayam

Australia trial for GM fruit fly

MedflyImage copyright Oxitec

Australia will carry out trials of a genetically modified insect to see if it can control a destructive crop pest.

The engineered Mediterranean fruit flies possess a gene that prevents female flies from reaching adulthood.

When released into the environment, they mate with wild members of the same species and pass on the gene to their offspring, which die before they can cause damage to crops.

The flies have been produced by the British-based company Oxitec.

This invasive species causes millions of dollars in damage to Australian crops each year.

The Department of Agriculture and Food in Western Australia (DAFWA) has now announced it will conduct an indoor assessment of the engineered fruit flies.

Eggs were imported from the UK and reared at DAFWA research facilities. Their potential for pest control will now be assessed in glasshouse trials.

In Western Australia, the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), also known as the Medfly, is a major problem for commercial orchards and householders.

It feeds on more than 250 types of fruit, including citrus, apricots, nectarines, peaches, mangoes, apples and pears.

The female medfly “stings” fruits as she lays her eggs, making them vulnerable to infection and rot.

A decision last year by Australian regulators to phase out the organophosphate insecticide fenthion has prompted a search for alternative methods of controlling the fruit pest.

Oxitec male flies are released to mate with wild female flies. When they do, they pass on a “self-limiting” gene which prevents female offspring from reaching adulthood.

This prevents the females from stinging fruit crops, or reproducing, thus shrinking populations of the fly in the release area.

“We need to evaluate new tools that could become a helpful part of integrated pest management practices,” said Dr Neil Morrison, research lead for agricultural pest control at Oxitec.

The principles used to create the GM medfly have already been trialled against dengue fever-carrying mosquitoes in the Cayman Islands, Panama and Brazil.

A genetically modified diamondback moth – another crop pest – is currently undergoing trials in the US.

Releases of Oxitec insects have been criticised by groups opposed to genetic modification. Nevertheless, the Oxford-based company was bought up by US biotechnology firm Intrexon in a $ 160m deal.


More from Science/Environment News

The use of genetically engineered animals could revolutionise areas of public health and agriculture, according to advocates. But is the world ready for modified mosquitoes and GM salmon?

Image copyright Oxitec

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