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Cheers as planet adopts historic Paris climate deal

Updated December 13, 2015 06:19:57

Climate change protesters in Paris hold a banner which reads Photo: Environmentalists hold a banner which reads, “Crank up the Action” at a demonstration in Paris (Reuters: Mal Langsdon)
Associated Story: Final wording of Paris climate pact sorted
Map: France

The global climate alter conference in Paris has adopted an international accord aimed at transforming the world’s fossil fuel-driven economy within decades and slowing the pace of worldwide warming to well under two degrees Celsius.

Important points:

  • Draft climate deal limits worldwide warming to “possibly 1.5 degrees”
  • Sets out system of 5-yearly testimonials and monitoring of each and every nation’s progress
  • Climate financing for establishing countries of at least $ 100b by 2020

French foreign minister Laurent Fabius ended almost a fortnight of gruelling talks with the bang of a gavel, marking consensus among the ministers, who stood for a number of minutes to clap and shout their joy.

“I see the room, I see the reaction is positive, I hear no objection. The Paris climate accord is adopted,” Mr Fabius declared, adding: “It may be a tiny gavel but it can do large things.”

The new treaty will commence in 2020.

Mr Fabius mentioned the deal would limit worldwide warming – which threatens humanity with increasing seas and worsening droughts, floods and storms – to “well below two degrees Celsius, probably 1.five”.

US president Barack Obama instantly tweeted: “This is enormous: Practically each and every country in the world just signed on to the #ParisAgreement on climate change.”

Foreign minister Julie Bishop spoke on behalf of the Umbrella Group of Nations, a loose coalition of developed countries not in Europe.

“Our perform right here is accomplished and now we can return property to implement this historic agreement. This is a pivotal moment,” she said.

“No nation would see this as the perfect outcome. Definitely it does not incorporate everything that we envisaged.

“However this agreement does give us a approach to operate more than coming years and decade to build the strong and successful action the planet wants.”

As he released the final wording, Mr Fabius urged nations to sign up to the treaty saying: “If today we were to fail, how could we rebuild this hope? Trust would be irrevocably lost and beyond that the really credibility of multilateralism and the international community as an entity able to respond to challenges. This is what is at stake.”

Setting a broad purpose of eliminating the net boost in man-created greenhouse gas emission this century, the agreement does not mandate specific measures or targets.

Rather, it creates a system for ensuring nations make great on voluntary domestic efforts to curb emissions, and offers billions far more dollars to aid poor nations cope with the transition to a greener economy.

“This text contains the principal components that we did feel just before would be impossible to attain. It is differentiated, fair, sturdy, dynamic, balanced and legally binding,” Mr Fabius mentioned.

For the initial time, a limit of 1.5C has been locked into the treaty following a concerted push by tiny island nations who stated their very existence was threatened if the planet limited international warming to 2C.

The treaty said the globe will be “holding the increase in the global typical temperature to properly beneath 2C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature enhance to 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels, recognising that this would considerably minimize the risks and impacts of climate adjust”.

Kellie Caught from WWF Australia was among the several environment groups that hailed the move.

“By which includes a long-term temperature aim of effectively below 2C of warming with a reference to a 1.5C objective, the newest draft text sends a sturdy signal that governments are committed to becoming in line with science,” she mentioned.

“What we need now is for their actions, like emission reductions and finance, to add up to delivering on that objective.”

The United Nations negotiations on climate modify have been moving incrementally considering that 1992.

In 1997 the the world’s most significant emitters of climate changing greenhouse gases signed up to the Kyoto Protocol, but it was an agreement constantly fraught with disagreement.

With its scheduled conclusion in 2012, the planet scrambled to find a replacement. The negotiations in 2009, held that year in Copenhagen, had been highly anticipated, but ended in chaos and disappointment. In the lead up to this year’s meeting, the French hosts worked challenging to keep away from the identical conclusion.

The standing ovation provided to Mr Fabius, the head of the meeting, was testament to the powerful progress of the meeting.

Scientists have warned for decades that the boost in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere – largely from burning coal oil and gas – would lead to a lot more of the Sun’s heat getting trapped on Earth. This year is shaping up to be the hottest year on record, with 2014 the earlier record holder.

Outside the plenary on the streets of Paris, thousands of demonstrators wore red to signify the red line they did not want the globe to cross.

External Link: Read the complete draft agreement
External Hyperlink: COP21 deal storify

ABC/Wires

Subjects: climate-alter, atmosphere, government-and-politics, weather, france

First posted December 12, 2015 22:03:50

Agen Sabung Ayam

Funds row threatens historic climate deal in Paris

Posted December 03, 2015 12:52:52

French president Francois Hollande Photo: The French have called for a swift compromise on the money rich nations should spend on climate change. (AFP: Philippe Wojazer)

Developing nations have warned that a bitter row over money is threatening efforts to seal a historic pact to tame global warming, as the French hosts pleaded for compromise.

Key points:

  • Nations urged to reach speedy agreement on climate change funding
  • Developing nations want rich countries to contribute more than $ 100b to climate fight
  • Concerns are being raised that the talks are not moving fast enough

The UN-brokered talks involving 195 nations are facing a deadline of December 11 to forge an agreement aimed at cutting the greenhouse gases responsible for climate change, and averting its catastrophic impacts.

Despite more than 150 world leaders opening the talks on Monday with lofty rhetoric about the urgency of the task, bureaucrats became quickly ensnared in familiar rows that have condemned previous efforts to failure.

“My message is clear: we must accelerate the process because there is still a lot of work to do,” said French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, who is presiding over the negotiations.

“Options for compromise need to be found as quickly as possible.”

One of the most fiercely contested issues in the 25-year diplomatic effort to find a solution to global warming has been how much responsibility rich nations must accept for the problem, and therefore how much they should pay.

Developed countries have powered their way to prosperity since the Industrial Revolution by burning coal, oil and gas, which are the primary sources of the heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions.

Developing nations insist the developed ones must now largely finance the world economy’s costly shift away fossil fuels, a debate worth hundreds of billions of dollars.

More than $ 100 billion needed for climate fight

A powerful bloc of 134 developing nations — including China, India and all African and South American countries — released a statement near the end of Wednesday’s negotiations insisting the rich were again trying in Paris to absolve themselves of their financial responsibilities.

“Nothing … can be achieved without the provision of means of implementation to enable developing countries to play their part to address climate change,” the statement said.

The bloc, known as the G77 plus China, restated a demand for rich nations to follow through on their commitment to mobilise $ 100 billion a year into a climate change from 2020.

It also demanded as “substantial scaling up of finance” on top of the previously agreed $ 100 billion.

The financing issue is central to hugely complex 54-page draft text that negotiators need to trim down by the weekend, so that ministers have a week to try and finalise it.

Frustration permeated the negotiating halls of the convention centre in the northern outskirts of Paris on Wednesday.

“We are not making anywhere near the progress we need to be making at this point,” said Daniel Reifsnyder, one of the two co-chairmen in the talks’ key arena.

Early disagreements typical at climate talks

Greenpeace climate campaigner Li Shuo, who has observer status in the talks, described them as “quite messy”.

“At some point, we definitely need to switch gear,” he said.

Still, such frustrations are typical of the start of climate negotiations, where vast interests are at stake and a single word in an agreement can have big repercussions, said veteran observers.

“I remain confident that it will be a hard fought two weeks but at the end of the day we are likely to achieve, and I believe we will achieve, an agreement,” Australian Environment Minister Greg Hunt told reporters.

UN climate chief Christiana Figueres cautioned against despair.

“The text of the agreement will go through ups and downs, there will be many commas inserted and commas removed because that is the nature of this. It is a legally binding text and needs to be reviewed very, very carefully,” she said.

Touching on the rich-poor issue, British charity Oxfam issued a study saying the wealthiest 10 per cent of people produce half of Earth’s fossil-fuel emissions, while the poorest half contribute a mere 10 per cent.

An average person among the richest one percent emits 175 times more carbon than his or her counterpart among the bottom 10 per cent, the charity said.

At the core of the talks is the goal of limiting warming to a maximum of two degrees Celsius over pre-Industrial Revolution levels.

That objective — along with a more ambitious option of 1.5 degrees Celsius — has been enshrined in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) since 2010.

Since then, scientists have pounded out an ever-louder warning that relentlessly climbing carbon emissions will doom future generations to rising seas and worsening floods, storms and drought — a recipe for hunger, disease and homelessness for many millions.

AFP

Topics: environment, climate-change, france

Agen Sabung Ayam