Tag Archives: nuclear

Nuclear waste arrives at temporary Lucas Heights storage facility

Posted December 06, 2015 20:45:45

Australia’s first import of reprocessed nuclear waste has arrived at its temporary storage facility in New South Wales without incident, after being repatriated from France.

In the early hours of Sunday morning, a tank holding 20 canisters of what is called immediate-level waste, was taken to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANTSO) facility at Lucas Heights.

The canisters, each about one metre in height and with a 170-litre capacity, were carrying about 25 tonnes of nuclear waste.

ANTSO’s head of nuclear services, Hef Griffiths, moved to allay concerns the tanks and the BBC Shanghai ship, which was commissioned to transport the waste, were unsafe.

“[The canisters] have to be type-tested against a nine-metre drop, an 800-degree-Celsius fire for 30 minutes, a drop on a penetrating spike and the design basis was to withstand the impact of a fully laden fighter jet,” he said.

“French maritime authorities conducted a full safety inspection of the ship and in discussions with the captain, he told me it was the most thorough safety inspection he had been involved in, in 26 years.”

The waste will be stored temporarily at Lucas Heights until the Federal Government decides where to build the national dumping site.

Six areas have been named on its shortlist, including three in South Australia, where a royal commission is currently underway to investigate whether the state should become more involved in the nuclear industry.

Arrival of nuclear waste alarms environmentalists

The ship’s arrival at Port Kembla on Saturday attracted a number of spectators, including Greenpeace activists arguing the Australian public did not support the return of nuclear waste.

The environmentalist group commissioned a poll which showed nearly three quarters of Australians opposed plans to store nuclear waste for other countries.

What nuclear waste will be stored?

Low-level waste

  • Emits radiation at levels that generally require minimal shielding during handling, transport and storage
  • Examples include paper, plastic, gloves, cloths and filters which contain small amounts of radioactivity
  • Could include items, such as test tubes, that have come into contact with nuclear medicine

Intermediate Waste

  • Emits a higher level of radiation and requires additional shielding
  • Generated from radiopharmaceutical production and reactor operations
  • For example, steel rods that come from the reactors

Source: ANSTO

Greenpeace spokeswoman Emma Gibson was on a boat following the BBC Shanghai and said it appeared unsuitable to transport the radioactive waste.

“It’s a right rust bucket of a ship which is what I was expecting,” she said on Saturday.

“It’s been banned by the US government from carrying any kind of government cargo at all, but the Australian Government has decided that this ship is good enough to transport highly radioactive nuclear waste from France to Sydney.

“[The Australian Government] is saying it’s intermediate-level nuclear waste like gloves, protective clothing, but the French authorities have told Greenpeace that this is high-level nuclear waste containing plutonium — that’s the most dangerous kind of nuclear waste you can get.”

ANSTO have said Greenpeace’s comments about the presence of plutonium were inaccurate, and maintain the waste is safe and medium level, and that high-level waste stems from weapons and energy production.

In the past two decades Australia has sent eight shiploads of waste overseas to France, the United Kingdom, and the United States, to be processed for long-term storage.

The waste sent to the UK will return in the second half of this decade and the shipments sent to the US will remain there.

The next shipment of waste to be brought back to Australia is expected to arrive in 2020, and will be a quarter of the size.

Topics: nuclear-issues, nuclear-energy, environmental-impact, lucas-heights-2234, nsw, port-kembla-2505

Agen Sabung Ayam

Activists descend on port ahead of nuclear waste ship’s arrival

By Emily Laurence and staff

Posted December 05, 2015 11:12:23

Greenpeace nuke ship Photo: Greenpeace activists track the BBC Shanghai. (Supplied: Greenpeace/Dominic Lorrimer)
Related Story: Very first nuclear waste shipment returns to Australia nowadays
Map: Port Kembla 2505

A major safety operation is underway at Port Kembla, on the New South Wales south coast, exactly where a shipment of nuclear waste is due to arrive.

On board the BBC Shanghai is 25 tonnes of nuclear waste, processed in France, for lengthy-term storage in Australia.

Greenpeace activists have taken to the water and shore in protest of the ship’s arrival.

Much more than 50 water police were involved in on-water operations on jet skis, tactical response boats and command vessel Nemesis.

About 500 police will be involved in the land-primarily based operation as the waste is transported to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) facility at Lucas Heights, in Sydney’s south.

The Federal Government is in the process of obtaining a permanent internet site for the dump and the waste will be kept at ANSTO in the interim.

Six regions have been named on its shortlist, including three in South Australia.

South Australia is currently holding a royal commission to investigate whether or not the state ought to turn out to be more involved in the nuclear industry.

Public consultation about the website of a permanent waste facility is underway and the Federal Government will narrow down the list to just three web sites early next year.

Australians do not want waste, activists say

Greenpeace said the Australian public do not help the return of the nuclear waste.

It has commissioned a poll, displaying nearly 3 quarters of Australians oppose plans to store nuclear waste for other countries.

The ReachTEL poll conducted in November surveyed three,144 individuals.

It identified 72.1 per cent of respondents opposed the concept of relocating waste to Australia, 9.six per cent had been undecided and 18.3 per cent supported it.

The poll had a margin of error of 1.9 per cent.

BBC Shanghai Photo: BBC Shanghai is shipping 25 tonnes of reprocessed nuclear waste from France to Port Kembla. (Supplied: Greenpeace/Dominic Lorrimer)

Bringing reprocessed waste back to Australia

In the past two decades Australia has sent eight shiploads of waste overseas.

In the 1990s, the Federal Government created a deal with France to take some of our nuclear waste.

Australia does not have the capacity to reprocess it to make it protected for extended-term storage.

France has now completed that and what is left is on a ship coming residence.

Eight shipments have been sent to France, the United Kingdom and the United States in the 1990s and early 2000s.

The waste sent to the UK will return in the second half of this decade and the waste sent to the US will stay there.

Topics: nuclear-issues, nuclear-energy, environmental-impact, port-kembla-2505, nsw, australia

Agen Sabung Ayam

1st nuclear waste shipment returns to Australia tomorrow

Posted December 04, 2015 19:07:24

The very first shipment of Australian nuclear waste processed in France for lengthy-term storage is expected to arrive back in the nation tomorrow.

In the previous two decades Australia has sent eight shiploads of waste overseas.

The Federal Government is now looking for a permanent dump site, not only for the waste to come back from Europe, but for locally created nuclear health-related waste.

In the 1990s, the Federal Government produced a deal with France to take some of our nuclear waste.

Australia does not have the capacity to reprocess it to make it secure for extended-term storage.

France has now completed that and what is left is on a ship coming property.

Emma Gibson from Greenpeace mentioned the group was expecting it to arrive at Port Kembla tomorrow.

“Greenpeace is going to be down there waiting for the ship to arrive,” she said.

“We’re going to document it coming in … and document it unloading its cargo and taking it to Lucas Heights to make confident we can reassure people that it’s got there safely.”

I believe it really is genuinely essential that we raise these problems with the initial shipment now and to make confident that we do not get far more dodgy stuff taking place in future.

Emma Gibson, Greenpeace

The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) is refusing to confirm when the ship will dock.

Greenpeace has raised a number of issues about the safety of the ship carrying the waste, the BBC Shanghai.

ANSTO has rejected claims that it is not seaworthy, and said it passed a rigorous safety inspection just before leaving France.

Right after the waste is unloaded, it will be taken to the nuclear facility at Lucas Heights.

“We’re all going to breathe a sigh of relief when this dodgy ship in fact arrives and we want it to unload its cargo as safely as feasible and take it by road to Lucas Heights, where we’ll all breathe a sigh of relief when it gets there.”

More waste to return from UK

Eight shipments have been sent to France, the United Kingdom and the United States in the ’90s and early 2000s.

The waste sent to the UK will return in the second half of this decade and the waste sent to the US will remain there.

“I think it’s genuinely crucial that we raise these issues with the 1st shipment now and to make confident that we don’t get more dodgy stuff happening in future,” Ms Gibson said.

Greenpeace has alleged that the waste onboard is more harmful than what the Government is reporting, but ANSTO has rejected the claims.

Even though the waste will be kept at Lucas Heights in the interim, the Federal Government is in the midst of discovering a permanent website for the dump.

Six areas have been named on its shortlist, which includes 3 in South Australia.

South Australia is currently holding a royal commission to investigate no matter whether the state must turn out to be more involved in the nuclear market.

Public consultation about the website of a permanent waste facility is underway and the Federal Government will narrow down the list to just three websites early next year.

Subjects: nuclear-power, nuclear-issues, sa, australia

Agen Sabung Ayam

Neighbours of proposed nuclear dump upset at ‘lack of consultation’

By Rosa Ellen

Posted November 25, 2015 19:34:56

Neighbours to a proposed nuclear waste website south of Alice Springs are upset they have been not consulted by the property’s owner and say they will oppose it.

The Aridgold date farm in Hale, 75 kilometres from Alice Springs, is 1 of six web sites shortlisted to house the country’s low-to-intermediate level radioactive waste.

Bordering the date farm is a land trust produced up of three homesteads, the closest of which is the Oak Valley Outstation owned by Mary Le Rossignol and her husband Robert, who are also traditional owners.

Ms Le Rossignol stated she first heard Tim Micklem, their neighbour of 30 years, had nominated his house as the country’s subsequent nuclear waste dump on ABC Regional Radio.

“I was angry due to the fact we reside correct next door to him,” Ms Le Rossignol stated.

“It just hit me tough, since I honestly expected individuals to go about and speak to your neighbours and let them know what was going on.

“But that did not come about here.”

The Federal Government has stated landholders whose sites have been selected would acquire up to four instances the marketplace worth of the land, and communities would be presented $ ten million to invest on infrastructure and other projects.

But Ms Le Rossignol mentioned that did not interest them.

“We weren’t interested in the funds portion of it, we have been just worried about the land and what it might do to it simply because this is exactly where my grandmother comes from,” she stated.

The Le Rossignols are component of substantial Southern Arrernte household with 30 loved ones members living permanently on the 130 square-kilometre land trust, and another 100 members going to and staying regularly.

“Our connection to our country is not just looking at it and saying that it really is dirt,” the Le Rossignols’ daughter Loyola Jones mentioned.

“It is spiritual, religious, historical. We’ve got anthropology and archaeology that’s been dated at amongst 15,000 to 20,000 year old, so that is my ancestors and we’ve been right here a very long time.”

Given that the Federal Government announcement, the outstation has been visited by Government representatives and its nuclear agency, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technologies Organisation, as properly as the Central Land Council and anti-nuclear groups from Alice Springs.

But Mr Le Rossignol mentioned their queries about what sort of intermediate-level waste would be stored 15 kilometres from their property and garden have not been answered.

“Originally it was just low-level and then they brought in intermediate and when we queried what intermediate was we couldn’t get an answer,” Mr Rossignol mentioned.

“Then halfway through a conversation they mentioned intermediate and low level,” he said.

Government representatives will return for a week of community meetings next month at nearby remote communities.

Topics: nuclear-troubles, government-and-politics, alice-springs-0870

Agen Sabung Ayam

I’m a nuclear armageddon survivor: Ask me anything

Agen Sabung Ayam

Press events are usually decadent affairs of meals, drink, and well-dressed executives in up-market hotels. Not this one. A little number of journalists such as your correspondent had been dumped at dusk in a wet field in the Essex countryside, given blue boilersuits and a tiny knapsack containing bottle-tops and leaflets, and told to await developments. As most press events do not ask for disclosure of any healthcare circumstances, nor involve signing a waiver against accidents, those developments have been unlikely to be pleasant.

But then, it is rarely pleasant soon after a nuclear war. In honour of the launch of Fallout four, set in the aftermath of virtual atomic conflict, we had been about to be taken into an ex-government, ex-secret nuclear bunker and educated to survive the apocalypse. Not the zombie sort, which has of late spawned an whole industry of films, games, and survival books, but the true point, which hasn’t.

You almost certainly haven’t believed nearly as significantly about atomic weapons as you have about zombies. That’s odd. Zombies do not exist, although on the other hand there’s currently a nuke programmed with your postcode sitting in a bunker appropriate now (see “Atomic Weapons: A Consumer’s Guide” later in this story for a lot more information). The actual apocalypse could be four minutes away from now. Really.

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